Hormone Health And Weightloss https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com Hormone Replacement Experts Wed, 24 Jan 2024 15:53:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.4.3 Navigating Menopause: Tips and Tricks for a Smooth Transition https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/navigating-menopause-tips-and-tricks-for-a-smooth-transition/ https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/navigating-menopause-tips-and-tricks-for-a-smooth-transition/#respond Wed, 07 Feb 2024 15:46:41 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/?p=4724 Navigating Menopause: Tips and Tricks for a Smooth Transition

Menopause is a natural biological process that marks the end of a woman’s reproductive years. It is a significant milestone in a woman’s life and can have a profound impact on her physical and emotional well-being. Menopause occurs when a woman’s ovaries stop producing eggs and her hormone levels, particularly estrogen and progesterone, decline. This hormonal shift can lead to a variety of symptoms and changes in the body. It is important for women to understand what to expect during menopause and how to manage the associated symptoms in order to prioritize their health and well-being.

Understanding Menopause: What It Is and What to Expect

Menopause is defined as the permanent cessation of menstruation, marking the end of a woman’s reproductive years. It is typically diagnosed after a woman has gone without a period for 12 consecutive months. However, the transition into menopause, known as perimenopause, can begin several years before this final cessation of menstruation. During perimenopause, a woman may experience irregular periods, changes in menstrual flow, and other symptoms as her hormone levels fluctuate.

The average age for menopause onset is around 51 years old, but it can occur anywhere between the ages of 45 and 55.  However, some women may experience menopause earlier or later than this range. Factors such as genetics, smoking, certain medical conditions, and certain surgeries (such as hysterectomy and removal of the ovaries) can influence the timing of menopause.

The decline in estrogen and progesterone levels during menopause can have various effects on the body. These hormonal changes can lead to symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings, vaginal dryness, sleep disturbances, and more. It is important for women to be aware of these potential changes and understand how to manage them effectively.

Common Symptoms of Menopause and How to Manage Them

1. Hot flashes and night sweats: Hot flashes are sudden feelings of intense heat, often accompanied by sweating and flushing of the face and neck. Night sweats are hot flashes that occur during sleep, leading to excessive sweating and disrupted sleep. These symptoms can be managed by dressing in layers, using a fan or air conditioning, avoiding triggers such as spicy foods and hot beverages, and practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing.

2. Mood swings and irritability: Hormonal changes during menopause can lead to mood swings, irritability, and even depression or anxiety in some women. It is important to prioritize self-care during this time and engage in activities that promote emotional well-being, such as exercise, spending time with loved ones, and seeking support from friends, family, or a therapist if needed.

3. Vaginal dryness and discomfort: Declining estrogen levels can cause vaginal dryness, itching, and discomfort during intercourse. Using water-based lubricants or moisturizers can help alleviate these symptoms. Additionally, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or low-dose vaginal estrogen therapy may be recommended for women experiencing severe vaginal symptoms.  Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT), also known as Bio Natural Hormone Replacement Therapy (BNHRT), is shown to carry fewer side effects than traditional Synthetic HRT and more closely mimics the body’s natural physiology. 

4. Sleep disturbances: Many women experience sleep disturbances during menopause, including difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, or waking up too early. Practicing good sleep hygiene, such as maintaining a regular sleep schedule, creating a relaxing bedtime routine, and creating a comfortable sleep environment can help improve sleep quality. If sleep disturbances persist, it may be helpful to consult with a healthcare provider for further evaluation and treatment options.

The Importance of a Healthy Lifestyle during Menopause

Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is crucial during menopause to support overall health and well-being. Regular exercise has been shown to reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes, improve mood, promote better sleep, and help maintain a healthy weight. Engaging in activities such as walking, swimming, yoga, or strength training can have numerous benefits during this time.

Eating a balanced diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, and healthy fats is also important during menopause. This can help support overall health, manage weight, and reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and osteoporosis. It is also important to stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water throughout the day.

Stress reduction techniques such as deep breathing, meditation, yoga, or engaging in hobbies or activities that bring joy and relaxation can also be beneficial during menopause. Chronic stress can exacerbate menopause symptoms and have negative effects on overall health. Prioritizing self-care and finding healthy ways to manage stress can help improve well-being during this time.

Maintaining a healthy weight is important during menopause as it can help reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes. It can also help alleviate certain menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and joint pain. Avoiding smoking and excessive alcohol consumption is also important for overall health during menopause.

Hormone Replacement Therapy: Pros and Cons

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) involves taking medications that contain hormones, typically estrogen and progesterone, to replace the hormones that the body no longer produces in sufficient amounts during menopause. HRT can be an effective treatment for managing menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and mood swings. There are generally two categories of HRT.  There is traditional Synthetic HRT (commonly referred to as HRT) and there is Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (BHRT) or by another name Bio-Natural Hormone Replacement Therapy (BNHRT).  The difference is that HRT uses synthetic compounds, some linked to adverse side effects because they are chemically different than what the body produces naturally. BHRT or BNHRT are compounded to form a chemical structure that most closely resembles human physiology.  BHRT/BNHRT are known to have fewer side effects and are safer and more efficacious than traditional HRT.

Benefits of hormone replacement therapy include relief from menopause symptoms, prevention of bone loss (osteoporosis), and potential reduction in the risk of certain chronic diseases such as heart disease. However, there are also risks associated with Synthetic HRT. These include an increased risk of blood clots, stroke, heart disease, breast cancer, and gallbladder disease.  Medical literature has shown that BHRT/BNHRT have fewer side effects and are safer and more efficacious than Synthetic HRT.

It is important for women considering hormone replacement therapy to discuss the potential benefits and risks with their healthcare provider. The decision to use HRT hormone replacement therapy should be based on an individual’s specific health history, symptoms, and personal preferences. For women who cannot or choose not to use HRT hormone replacement therapy, there are alternative treatments available to manage menopause symptoms.

Alternative Treatments for Menopause Symptoms

For women who cannot or choose not to use hormone replacement therapy, there are alternative treatments available to manage menopause symptoms. These include non-hormonal treatments such as herbal supplements, acupuncture, and lifestyle changes.

Herbal supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, and soy isoflavones have been used by some women to alleviate menopause symptoms. However, it is important to note that the effectiveness of these supplements varies and more research is needed to determine their safety and efficacy.

Acupuncture is another alternative treatment that has been shown to provide relief from hot flashes and other menopause symptoms in some women. It involves the insertion of thin needles into specific points on the body to stimulate energy flow. While acupuncture is generally considered safe, it is important to seek treatment from a qualified and licensed practitioner.

Lifestyle changes can also be effective in managing menopause symptoms. These include maintaining a healthy diet, engaging in regular exercise, practicing stress reduction techniques, getting enough sleep, and avoiding triggers such as caffeine and alcohol. It may be helpful to keep a symptom diary to identify triggers and patterns in order to better manage symptoms.

Maintaining Sexual Health during Menopause

Menopause can bring about changes in sexual desire and function for many women. Declining estrogen levels can lead to vaginal dryness, decreased libido, and discomfort during intercourse. It is important for women to prioritize their sexual health and maintain intimacy with their partner during this time.

Using water-based lubricants or moisturizers can help alleviate vaginal dryness and discomfort. Engaging in regular sexual activity can also help maintain vaginal elasticity and blood flow. Open communication with a partner about any concerns or changes in sexual desire or function is crucial for maintaining a healthy and satisfying sexual relationship.

If menopause symptoms are significantly impacting sexual health and well-being, it may be helpful to consult with a healthcare provider. They can provide guidance and recommend treatments such as hormone therapy or low-dose vaginal estrogen therapy to alleviate symptoms and improve sexual health.

Coping with Emotional Changes during Menopause

Menopause can bring about emotional changes such as mood swings, anxiety, and even depression in some women. These changes are often attributed to hormonal fluctuations and the physical and emotional adjustments that come with this life stage. It is important for women to prioritize self-care and seek support when needed.

Engaging in activities that promote emotional well-being, such as exercise, spending time with loved ones, pursuing hobbies or interests, and practicing relaxation techniques can help manage emotional changes during menopause. It may also be helpful to seek support from friends, family, or a therapist who can provide guidance and coping strategies.

If symptoms of anxiety or depression persist or significantly impact daily functioning, it is important to consult with a healthcare provider. They can provide a proper diagnosis and recommend appropriate treatment options such as therapy or medication if necessary.

Menopause and Bone Health: Preventing Osteoporosis

During menopause, women are at an increased risk of developing osteoporosis, a condition characterized by weak and brittle bones. This is because estrogen plays a crucial role in maintaining bone density, and the decline in estrogen levels during menopause can lead to bone loss.

To maintain bone health during menopause, it is important to engage in weight-bearing exercises such as walking, jogging, dancing, or weightlifting. These activities help stimulate bone growth and strengthen bones. It is also important to ensure an adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D through diet or supplementation.

Calcium-rich foods include dairy products, leafy green vegetables, tofu, almonds, and fortified foods such as orange juice. Vitamin D can be obtained through sun exposure or through foods such as fatty fish, egg yolks, and fortified dairy products. If necessary, calcium and vitamin D supplements may be recommended by a healthcare provider.

It is also important to undergo regular bone density testing, known as a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan, to assess bone health and identify any signs of osteoporosis. If osteoporosis is diagnosed, medication may be prescribed to help prevent further bone loss and reduce the risk of fractures.

Navigating Menopause at Work: Tips for Success

Menopause can present unique challenges for women in the workplace. Symptoms such as hot flashes, mood swings, and sleep disturbances can impact productivity and overall well-being. It is important for women to prioritize their health and well-being during this time and communicate their needs with their supervisor and HR department.

Some strategies for managing menopause symptoms at work include dressing in layers to accommodate temperature fluctuations, using a fan or personal cooling device, taking regular breaks to stretch or practice relaxation techniques, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle that includes regular exercise and stress reduction.

It may also be helpful to have open and honest conversations with supervisors or HR representatives about any accommodations or support that may be needed. This could include adjustments to work schedules or environments, flexible work arrangements, or access to resources such as employee assistance programs.

Women should not hesitate to advocate for their needs and seek support from colleagues or mentors who may have experienced similar challenges. It is important to remember that menopause is a natural part of life and should not be a barrier to professional success.

Talking to Your Doctor about Menopause: Questions to Ask and What to Expect

Regular check-ups and discussions with a healthcare provider are important during menopause to monitor overall health and address any concerns or symptoms. It is helpful to come prepared with questions and information about any symptoms or changes you may be experiencing.

Some questions to ask your healthcare provider about menopause symptoms and treatment options include:

– What are the typical symptoms of menopause and how long do they typically last?
– What treatment options are available for managing menopause symptoms?
– What are the potential benefits and risks of hormone replacement therapy?
– Are there any alternative treatments or lifestyle changes that may be effective in managing menopause symptoms?
– How often should I come in for check-ups and what tests or screenings should I expect during menopause?

During a visit, a healthcare provider may perform a physical examination, review medical history, and order tests or screenings as needed. These may include blood tests to assess hormone levels, bone density testing, mammograms, and other screenings based on individual risk factors.

It is important to be open and honest with your healthcare provider about any symptoms or concerns you may have. They are there to provide guidance, support, and appropriate treatment options to help manage menopause and promote overall health.


Menopause is a significant life stage that can have a profound impact on a woman’s health and well-being. It is important for women to understand what to expect during menopause and how to manage the associated symptoms effectively. By prioritizing a healthy lifestyle, seeking support when needed, and maintaining open communication with healthcare providers, women can navigate this transition with confidence and prioritize their health during this important time in their lives.

If you’re experiencing symptoms of menopause and wondering if you could be peri-menopausal, this article on hormonehealthandweightloss.com provides some helpful insights. It discusses the signs and symptoms of peri-menopause and how it can impact your hormones. Understanding these changes can help you navigate this transitional phase with more ease. Check out the article here to learn more.

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Riding the Rollercoaster: Understanding and Coping with Mood Swings https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/riding-the-rollercoaster-understanding-and-coping-with-mood-swings/ https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/riding-the-rollercoaster-understanding-and-coping-with-mood-swings/#respond Thu, 01 Feb 2024 15:46:33 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/?p=4723 Mood swings are a common occurrence in daily life, but for some individuals, they can have a significant impact on their overall well-being. Mood swings refer to rapid and intense changes in mood that can range from extreme happiness to deep sadness or irritability. These fluctuations can disrupt daily activities, strain relationships, and affect one’s ability to function effectively. Understanding the causes of mood swings and learning how to manage them is crucial for maintaining mental health and overall quality of life.

What are mood swings and why do they happen?

Mood swings are characterized by sudden and intense shifts in emotions. They can occur for various reasons, including hormonal changes, stress, and mental health conditions. Hormonal changes, such as those experienced during puberty, pregnancy, or menopause, can lead to mood swings due to the fluctuation of hormones in the body. Stress is another common trigger for mood swings, as it can overwhelm the body’s ability to cope with emotions effectively. Additionally, mental health conditions like bipolar disorder or borderline personality disorder can cause severe and frequent mood swings.

The impact of mood swings on daily life and relationships

Mood swings can have a significant impact on various aspects of daily life, including work, school, and personal relationships. In the workplace, frequent mood swings can affect productivity and interpersonal relationships with colleagues. It may be challenging to concentrate on tasks or maintain a positive attitude when experiencing intense emotional fluctuations. Similarly, in educational settings, mood swings can interfere with learning and academic performance.

In personal relationships, mood swings can strain communication and emotional connection. Loved ones may find it difficult to understand or cope with the sudden changes in mood, leading to misunderstandings or conflicts. This can create a cycle of frustration and isolation for both the individual experiencing mood swings and their loved ones.

Addressing mood swings is crucial for overall well-being. Ignoring or dismissing them may lead to worsening symptoms and a decline in mental health. Seeking support and implementing strategies to manage mood swings can help individuals regain control over their emotions and improve their quality of life.

Recognizing the signs and symptoms of mood swings

Recognizing the signs and symptoms of mood swings is essential for understanding when they occur and how they impact daily life. Common symptoms of mood swings include irritability, sadness, anxiety, anger, and sudden bursts of energy or euphoria. These emotions can be intense and may last for hours or even days. It is important to differentiate between normal mood fluctuations, which are a natural part of life, and more severe mood swings that disrupt daily functioning.

How to track and monitor your mood swings


Tracking and monitoring mood swings can provide valuable insights into patterns, triggers, and severity. Keeping a mood journal or using a mood tracking app can help individuals identify trends in their emotions and recognize potential triggers. By recording daily moods, activities, and any significant events or stressors, individuals can gain a better understanding of their emotional patterns. This information can be shared with healthcare providers or therapists to aid in diagnosis and treatment planning.

Coping strategies for managing mood swings

Managing mood swings involves implementing coping strategies that promote emotional regulation and overall well-being. Self-care practices play a crucial role in managing mood swings. Regular exercise, such as walking or yoga, can help release endorphins and reduce stress levels. Engaging in activities that bring joy or relaxation, such as reading, painting, or listening to music, can also help stabilize moods.

Techniques for managing stress and anxiety are also beneficial in managing mood swings. Deep breathing exercises, progressive muscle relaxation, and mindfulness meditation can help individuals calm their minds and regulate their emotions. Additionally, maintaining a healthy diet with balanced meals and adequate hydration can support stable moods.

The role of medication in treating mood swings

In some cases, medication may be necessary to manage severe or persistent mood swings. Antidepressants and mood stabilizers are commonly prescribed to help regulate emotions and stabilize moods. It is important to work closely with a healthcare provider to find the right medication and dosage, as individual responses can vary. Medication should always be used in conjunction with other therapeutic interventions, such as therapy or counseling.

The importance of self-care in managing mood swings

Prioritizing self-care practices is crucial for managing mood swings and maintaining overall mental health. Self-care involves taking intentional actions to nurture and care for oneself. This can include activities such as taking a bath, practicing mindfulness, spending time in nature, or engaging in hobbies. By prioritizing self-care, individuals can reduce stress levels, improve emotional well-being, and better manage mood swings.

How to communicate with loved ones about your mood swings

Open and honest communication with loved ones about mood swings is essential for maintaining healthy relationships. It is important to explain the nature of mood swings and how they impact daily life. Setting boundaries and expressing needs can help loved ones understand how to provide support without enabling or exacerbating the mood swings. Asking for support when needed and seeking understanding from loved ones can foster a sense of connection and reduce feelings of isolation.

Seeking professional help for severe mood swings

If mood swings become severe or significantly impact daily functioning, it may be necessary to seek professional help. A mental health professional can provide an accurate diagnosis, develop a treatment plan, and offer support throughout the recovery process. Therapy or counseling can be highly beneficial in helping individuals better understand and manage their mood swings.

The potential benefits of therapy for coping with mood swings

Therapy can play a crucial role in helping individuals cope with and manage their mood swings effectively. Different types of therapy, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), can provide individuals with the tools and strategies to regulate their emotions, identify triggers, and develop healthy coping mechanisms. Therapy can also provide a safe space for individuals to explore underlying issues that may contribute to mood swings and work towards long-term emotional stability.

Mood swings can have a significant impact on daily life and relationships, but with the right strategies and support, they can be effectively managed. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of mood swings, tracking and monitoring them, implementing coping strategies, and seeking professional help when needed are all crucial steps in managing mood swings. Prioritizing self-care and open communication with loved ones can also contribute to overall well-being. Remember, seeking help and support is a sign of strength, and there are resources available to help individuals navigate the challenges of mood swings.

If you’re struggling with mood swings, you may find this article on hormone therapy helpful. It discusses the benefits of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy for women dealing with menopause and how it can help regulate mood swings and other symptoms. Check it out here.

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Breaking the Night Sweats Cycle: Tips to Help You Sleep Better https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/breaking-the-night-sweats-cycle-tips-to-help-you-sleep-better/ https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/breaking-the-night-sweats-cycle-tips-to-help-you-sleep-better/#respond Tue, 30 Jan 2024 15:43:32 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/?p=4720 Night sweats refer to excessive sweating during sleep that can soak through clothing and bedding. It is a common problem that affects many people and can significantly impact sleep quality. When night sweats occur, they can disrupt sleep, leading to fatigue, irritability, and decreased overall well-being.

Identifying the underlying cause of night sweats is crucial in order to effectively manage the condition. Night sweats can be a symptom of an underlying medical condition, medications prescribed, decrease in certain hormone levels or a result of environmental factors. By understanding the causes and triggers of night sweats, individuals can take steps to alleviate the problem and improve their sleep quality.

Causes of Night Sweats: What Triggers Them?
Night sweats can be triggered by a variety of factors, including, as noted above, environmental conditions, medications, hormonal changes, and medical conditions. Environmental factors such as hot weather or an overheated bedroom can lead to excessive sweating during sleep. Certain medications, such as antidepressants or hormone therapy drugs, can also cause night sweats as a side effect.

Hormonal changes, particularly in women, can contribute to night sweats. Menopause is a common time for women to experience night sweats due to the fluctuation of hormones in the body. Additionally, certain medical conditions such as infections, cancer, hormonal disorders, and neurological conditions can also cause night sweats.

Health Conditions That Cause Night Sweats
Night sweats can be a symptom of various health conditions. Infections such as tuberculosis or HIV can cause night sweats as the body tries to fight off the infection. Cancer, particularly lymphoma, can also lead to excessive sweating during sleep.

Hormonal disorders such as hyperthyroidism or pheochromocytoma can disrupt the body’s natural temperature regulation system and result in night sweats. Neurological conditions like autonomic dysreflexia or stroke can also cause night sweats as a result of dysfunction in the nervous system.

Menopause and Night Sweats: What You Need to Know

Menopause is a natural stage in a woman’s life when her menstrual periods stop, and she can no longer conceive. It typically occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, but can occur sooner, particularly if surgically induced. Along with other symptoms such as hot flashes and mood swings, night sweats are a common occurrence during menopause.

During menopause, there is a significant decrease in estrogen levels in the body. This hormonal change can disrupt the body’s temperature regulation system, leading to hot flashes and night sweats. Night sweats during menopause can be particularly bothersome as they can disrupt sleep and lead to fatigue and irritability.

Treatment options for menopausal night sweats include hormone replacement therapy (HRT), which involves taking estrogen to alleviate symptoms. However, HRT is not suitable for everyone and may have potential risks. Over the past two decades, “Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy” (BHRT) or “Bio-Natural Hormone Replacement Therapy” (BNHRT) has been shown to have fewer side effects and less serious side effects than their synthetic counterparts.  Other non-hormonal treatments such as lifestyle changes, herbal remedies, and medications may also be considered.

Night Sweats and Anxiety: A Vicious Cycle 

Anxiety and night sweats often go hand in hand, creating a vicious cycle that can be challenging to break. Anxiety triggers the body’s fight-or-flight response, which can lead to an increase in body temperature and sweating. This can result in night sweats during sleep.

On the other hand, night sweats can worsen anxiety symptoms. Waking up drenched in sweat can be distressing and cause feelings of panic or unease. The fear of experiencing night sweats can also create anxiety about going to bed, leading to difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep.

Coping strategies for managing anxiety-related night sweats include practicing relaxation techniques such as deep breathing exercises or meditation before bed. Creating a calming bedtime routine and ensuring a comfortable sleep environment can also help reduce anxiety and improve sleep quality.

Tips to Help You Sleep Better with Night Sweats

While it may not be possible to completely eliminate night sweats, there are several strategies that can help individuals sleep better despite experiencing them. If the night seats are caused by a lack of estrogens (estradiol), then restoring that hormone to appropriate levels with BHRT/BNHRT can often address this issue in the short term. Practicing good sleep hygiene is essential, which includes maintaining a consistent sleep schedule, creating a comfortable sleep environment, and avoiding stimulating activities before bed.

Choosing the right bedding and clothing can also make a difference. Opting for moisture-wicking fabrics that help regulate body temperature can help keep individuals dry and comfortable throughout the night. Additionally, using breathable bedding materials and keeping the bedroom cool can help reduce the occurrence of night sweats.

Relaxation techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation or guided imagery can also be beneficial in managing night sweats. These techniques can help individuals relax and reduce stress, which may contribute to excessive sweating during sleep.

Cooling Techniques for Night Sweats

Implementing cooling techniques can help alleviate night sweats and improve sleep quality. Using fans or air conditioning in the bedroom can help circulate air and keep the room cool. Placing a fan near the bed or using a ceiling fan can provide a constant breeze that helps regulate body temperature.

Investing in cooling pillows or mattress pads made from materials that dissipate heat can also be helpful. These products are designed to provide a cooler sleeping surface and prevent excessive sweating during sleep.

Taking a cold shower before bed can also help lower body temperature and reduce the likelihood of night sweats. The cool water can help cool down the body and create a more comfortable sleeping environment.

Lifestyle Changes to Reduce Night Sweats

Making certain lifestyle changes can help reduce the frequency and severity of night sweats. Maintaining a healthy diet that includes plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins can support overall health and potentially alleviate night sweats.

Regular exercise has been shown to improve sleep quality and reduce symptoms of menopause-related night sweats. Engaging in activities such as walking, swimming, or yoga can help regulate hormones and promote better sleep.

Stress management techniques such as mindfulness meditation, yoga, or deep breathing exercises can also be beneficial in reducing night sweats. Stress can exacerbate night sweats, so finding healthy ways to manage stress can help break the cycle.

Identifying and avoiding triggers that may contribute to night sweats is also important. This may include avoiding spicy foods, caffeine, alcohol, or smoking, as these substances can increase body temperature and trigger sweating.

When to See a Doctor for Night Sweats

While occasional night sweats are usually not a cause for concern, there are certain circumstances when it is important to seek medical attention. If night sweats are persistent, severe, or accompanied by other symptoms such as fever, weight loss, or fatigue, it is recommended to consult a healthcare professional.

Providing a detailed medical history to the doctor is crucial in order to help identify the underlying cause of night sweats. This may include information about medications being taken, recent illnesses or infections, and any other relevant medical conditions.

Breaking the Night Sweats Cycle for Better Sleep

Night sweats can significantly impact sleep quality and overall well-being. Understanding the causes and triggers of night sweats is essential in order to effectively manage the condition. By identifying the underlying cause and implementing appropriate treatment options, individuals can break the cycle of night sweats and improve their sleep quality.

Coping strategies such as practicing relaxation techniques and implementing cooling techniques can also help alleviate night sweats and promote better sleep. Making lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising regularly, and managing stress can further support overall health and reduce the occurrence of night sweats.

If night sweats are persistent or accompanied by other concerning symptoms, it is important to seek medical attention to determine the underlying cause and receive appropriate treatment. With proper management and care, individuals can break the night sweats cycle and achieve better sleep quality.

If you’re experiencing night sweats, it could be a sign of hormonal imbalance. Hormone Health and Weight Loss offers valuable insights into the causes and solutions for night sweats in their article “Night Sweats: Causes and Treatment Options.” This informative piece discusses the various factors that can contribute to night sweats, such as menopause, medications, and medical conditions. It also provides practical tips and treatment options to help alleviate this uncomfortable symptom.

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Unlocking the Benefits of Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Comprehensive Guide https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/unlocking-the-benefits-of-hormone-replacement-therapy-a-comprehensive-guide/ https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/unlocking-the-benefits-of-hormone-replacement-therapy-a-comprehensive-guide/#respond Wed, 24 Jan 2024 14:08:33 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/?p=4713 Hormone replacement therapy is a medical treatment that involves replacing hormones that are no longer being produced in sufficient quantities by the body. It is commonly used to alleviate symptoms of menopause and andropause, as well as to address hormonal imbalances caused by thyroid disorders. Understanding hormone replacement therapy is important for those considering it, as it can greatly improve quality of life and overall health outcomes. In this article, we will explore what hormone replacement therapy is, how it works, the benefits it offers, who is a good candidate for it, the pros and cons of hormone replacement therapy compared to alternatives, different types of, hormone replacement therapy managing symptoms and reducing health risks associated with menopause and andropause, improving metabolism and energy levels in thyroid disorders, potential risks and side effects of , hormone replacement therapy working with healthcare providers to develop a personalized hormone replacement therapy plan, and the importance of seeking out more information and professional guidance.

Understanding Hormone Replacement Therapy: What is it and How Does it Work?


Hormone replacement therapy is a medical treatment that involves replacing hormones that are no longer being produced in sufficient quantities by the body. It is commonly used to alleviate symptoms of menopause and andropause, as well as to address hormonal imbalances caused by thyroid disorders.  Hormone replacement therapy works by introducing hormones into the body to mimic the effects of the hormones that are no longer being produced naturally.

There are generally two categories of hormone replacement therapy.  There is the traditional Synthetic form (commonly referred to as) and there is Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (B) or by another name Bio-Natural Hormone Replacement Therapy (BN).  The difference is that synthetic compounds, some linked to adverse side effects because they are chemically different than what the body produces naturally. B or BN are compounded to form a chemical structure that most closely resembles human physiology.  B/BN are known to have fewer side effects and are safer and more efficacious than traditional. For menopausal women, estrogen and progesterone are commonly used. Estrogen (in the form of Estradiol) helps alleviate symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and mood swings. Progesterone is often prescribed in combination with estrogen to reduce the risk of uterine cancer. B/BN is also considered to be protective against breast cancer.  In the case of andropause in men, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is used to address low testosterone levels. For individuals with thyroid disorders, synthetic thyroid hormones such as synthetic levothyroxine or natural desiccated thyroid medications are used to replace the hormones that the thyroid gland is not producing adequately.

The Benefits of Hormone Replacement Therapy: Improved Quality of Life and Health Outcomes


Hormone replacement therapy offers numerous benefits that can greatly improve quality of life and overall health outcomes. For menopausal women, hormone replacement therapy can alleviate symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, and mood swings. It can also help reduce the risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, which are more common in postmenopausal women. Additionally, hormone replacement therapy has been shown to improve mood and cognitive function in menopausal women.

Similarly, for men experiencing andropause,  can help address low testosterone levels and alleviate symptoms such as fatigue, decreased libido, muscle loss, and mood changes. It can also improve bone density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis in men.

For individuals with thyroid disorders, can help improve metabolism and energy levels by replacing the hormones that the thyroid gland is not producing adequately. This can lead to increased energy, improved mood, and better overall well-being.

Who is a Good Candidate for Hormone Replacement Therapy? Factors to Consider


Not everyone is a good candidate for hormone replacement therapy. Several factors need to be considered before starting. Generally, hormone replacement therapy is recommended for women who are experiencing moderate to severe menopausal symptoms and are in good overall health. For men with low testosterone levels, hormone replacement therapy may be considered if they are experiencing symptoms that significantly impact their quality of life.

Personal and family medical history is another important factor to consider when determining whether someone is a good candidate for  hormone replacement therapy. Individuals with a history of certain types of cancer, blood clots, or cardiovascular disease may not be suitable candidates for Synthetic but may be considered candidates for using B/BN. It is important to discuss personal and family medical history with a healthcare provider to determine the potential risks and benefits of hormone replacement therapy.

Lifestyle factors should also be taken into account when considering hormone replacement therapy. Smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, and a sedentary lifestyle can increase the risks associated with treatment. It is important to address these lifestyle factors before starting to minimize potential risks.

Hormone Replacement Therapy vs. Natural Alternatives: Weighing the Pros and Cons


While hormone replacement therapy can offer significant benefits, it is important to consider the pros and cons compared to natural alternatives. Natural alternatives include lifestyle changes, dietary modifications, herbal supplements, and alternative therapies such as acupuncture and yoga.

One of the main advantages of natural alternatives is that they are generally considered safer and have fewer potential side effects compared to . Lifestyle changes such as regular exercise, a healthy diet, and stress management techniques can help alleviate symptoms of menopause and andropause. Herbal supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, and soy products have been found to provide relief for some menopausal symptoms. Alternative therapies such as acupuncture and yoga can also help manage symptoms.

However, natural alternatives may not be as effective as hormone replacement therapy in alleviating severe symptoms or addressing hormonal imbalances.  hormone replacement therapy provides a more direct and targeted approach by replacing the hormones that are no longer being produced adequately by the body. It can offer faster relief and more significant improvements in quality of life for those experiencing severe symptoms.  B/BN provides a more natural response to hormone decline as the chemical structure of these compounds most closely mimics human biology. 

Types of Hormone Replacement Therapy: Choosing the Right Option for You


There are different types of hormone replacement therapy available, depending on the specific condition being treated. For menopausal women, the most common type of hormone replacement therapy is systemic estrogen therapy, which involves taking estrogen in a patch, gel, or spray. Estrogen should be taken in combination with natural micronized progesterone, which is often prescribed to reduce the risk of uterine or breast cancer. Local estrogen therapy, such as vaginal creams or rings, can also be used to alleviate vaginal dryness and discomfort.

For men with low testosterone levels, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is the main type of treatment. TRT can be administered through injections, patches, gels, or pellets implanted under the skin. The choice of administration method depends on individual preferences and needs.  Pellett therapy has been shown to provide the steadiest state of hormones for longer periods and better compliance than any other mode of administration.  

For individuals with thyroid disorders, synthetic thyroid hormones such as levothyroxine or natural desiccated thyroid are used to replace the hormones that the thyroid gland is not producing adequately. The dosage and type of thyroid hormone will be determined by a healthcare provider based on individual needs.

When choosing a type of hormone replacement therapy, it is important to consider factors such as convenience, effectiveness, potential side effects, and personal preferences. It is recommended to discuss these factors with a healthcare provider to determine the most suitable option.

Hormone Replacement Therapy for Menopause: Managing Symptoms and Reducing Health Risks


Menopause is a natural stage in a woman’s life when her menstrual periods stop permanently. It typically occurs between the ages of 45 and 55. Menopause is associated with a decline in estrogen levels, which can lead to various symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness, mood swings, and sleep disturbances.

Hormone replacement therapy can help manage these symptoms by replacing the declining levels of estrogen in the body. Estrogen therapy can alleviate hot flashes and night sweats, improve vaginal dryness, discomfort, and stabilize mood swings. It can also improve sleep quality and overall well-being.

In addition to symptom management, hormone replacement therapy can also reduce health risks associated with menopause. Estrogen therapy has been shown to improve bone density and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, which is more common in postmenopausal women. It can also reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by improving cholesterol levels and blood vessel function.

Hormone Replacement Therapy for Andropause: Addressing Low Testosterone Levels in Men


Andropause, also known as male menopause, is a condition characterized by a decline in testosterone levels in men. It typically occurs between the ages of 40 and 60. Andropause can cause symptoms such as fatigue, decreased libido, muscle loss, mood changes, and difficulty concentrating.

Hormone replacement therapy can help address low testosterone levels and alleviate these symptoms. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) involves replacing the declining levels of testosterone in the body. TRT can increase energy levels, improve libido and sexual function, increase muscle mass and strength, and stabilize mood.

However, it is important to note that TRT may have potential risks and side effects. It can cause acne and fluid retention. It is important to discuss the potential risks and benefits of TRT with a healthcare provider before starting treatment.

Hormone Replacement Therapy for Thyroid Disorders: Improving Metabolism and Energy Levels


Thyroid disorders are conditions that affect the thyroid gland, a small butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck. The thyroid gland produces hormones that regulate metabolism and energy levels in the body. When the thyroid gland is not producing hormones adequately, it can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, weight gain or loss, depression, and difficulty concentrating.

Hormone replacement therapy can help improve metabolism and energy levels by replacing the hormones that the thyroid gland is not producing adequately. Synthetic thyroid hormones such as levothyroxine or naturally desiccated thyroid such as Armor Thyroid are used to replace the deficient hormones. These are taken orally and is usually taken for life.

It is important to note that treatment for thyroid disorders may have potential risks and side effects. Taking too much or too little can lead to complications such as heart problems, bone loss, and mood changes. It is important to work closely with a healthcare provider to determine the appropriate dosage and monitor hormone levels regularly.

Potential Risks and Side Effects of Hormone Replacement Therapy: What You Need to Know


Hormone replacement therapy may have potential risks and side effects that need to be considered before starting treatment. For menopausal women, the use of estrogen therapy alone or in combination with progesterone using synthetic has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, blood clots, stroke, and heart disease. These risks are mitigated when using B/BN. The risks vary depending on factors such as age, duration of treatment, and personal medical history. It is important to discuss these risks with a healthcare provider before starting treatment.

For men with low testosterone levels, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) if incorrectly administered may increase the risk of prostate enlargement and accelerate and existing prostate cancer in some men. It can also cause acne, fluid retention, and sleep apnea. Regular monitoring of prostate health and hormone levels is important when undergoing TRT.

 Treatment for thyroid disorders may also have potential risks and side effects. Taking too much or too little levothyroxine or desiccated thyroid can lead to complications such as heart problems, bone loss, and mood changes. Regular monitoring of hormone levels is important when undergoing treatment for thyroid disorders.

It is important to work closely with a healthcare provider to minimize potential risks and side effects of treatment. Regular check-ups, hormone level monitoring, and open communication with a healthcare provider are essential for safe and effective hormone replacement therapy.

Working with Your Healthcare Provider to Develop a Hormone Replacement Therapy Plan that Works for You


Working with a healthcare provider is crucial when considering hormone replacement therapy. A healthcare provider who specializes in this specialty can provide guidance and support throughout the treatment process. They can help determine whether it is suitable for an individual based on factors such as age, health status, personal and family medical history, and lifestyle factors.

Finding a healthcare provider who specializes can be done by asking for referrals from primary care physicians or gynecologists, searching online directories, or contacting local hospitals or clinics. It is important to choose a healthcare provider who has experience and expertise in this specialty to ensure safe and effective treatment.

Developing a personalized plan involves discussing treatment options, potential risks and benefits, and individual preferences with a healthcare provider. The dosage, type of hormone, and administration method will be determined based on individual needs. Regular check-ups and hormone level monitoring will be scheduled to ensure the effectiveness and safety of the treatment.


Hormone replacement therapy is a medical treatment that involves replacing hormones that are no longer being produced in sufficient quantities by the body. It is commonly used to alleviate symptoms of menopause and andropause, as well as to address hormonal imbalances caused by thyroid disorders. Understanding hormone replacement therapy is important for those considering it, as it can greatly improve quality of life and overall health outcomes.

 Hormone replacement therapy offers numerous benefits, including improved symptoms of menopause and andropause, reduced risk of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, improved mood and cognitive function, and improved metabolism and energy levels in thyroid disorders. However, it is important to consider potential risks and side effects when deciding whether to pursue hormone replacement therapy.

Working with a healthcare provider who specializes in care is crucial for developing a personalized treatment plan that works for each individual. Regular check-ups, hormone level monitoring, and open communication with a healthcare provider are essential for safe and effective treatment. It is important to seek out more information and talk to a healthcare provider about hormone replacement therapy to make an informed decision about whether it is the right option.

If you’re interested in learning more about Hormone Replacement Therapy, you may also want to check out this article on “B for Women: The Basics” from Hormone Health and Weight Loss. This informative piece provides an overview of the different forms of hormone replacement therapy, such as traditional Synthetic Hormone Replacement Therapy, Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy (B), also known as Bio-Natural Hormone Replacement Therapy, specifically tailored for women dealing with menopause or men in Andropause. It discusses the benefits of B treatment, how it works, and what results to expect.

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I Can’t Be Peri-Menopausal, Right? https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/i-cant-be-peri-menopausal-right/ Wed, 17 Mar 2021 18:46:35 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/i-cant-be-peri-menopausal-right/ My periods had always been clockwork, no fertility problems, and no history of female issues. So you can imagine my surprise when like a light switch, peri-menopause greeted me suddenly at the ripe old age of 41. I didn’t know it was peri-menopause at first; that was the last thing on my mind. I thought that maybe it was something even worse, pregnancy. My period was irregular and had been for a couple of months, but it always came around. I got hot suddenly with no warning and not in a sexy way. My libido was dead, and my body didn’t even respond to sexual stimulation. Then I was visited by the ghost of sweaty nights. Night sweats showed up with a vengeance. I was so hot, looking for something to blame because I was always a cold-natured person. This must be my boyfriend’s fault, or even my dog, the little furnace that he was. It took two or three nights consecutively for me to realize that the problem was me. I had never had trouble sleeping, and my body was used to a consecutive 7-8 hours of uninterrupted sleep. Not anymore; I would wake up sweating, the sheets were wet. I had to change them or lay towels down to get by until the morning. Then I was freezing and couldn’t get warm. I would finally fall asleep for the whole vicious cycle to start over again. 

This was when I knew something was wrong, and I still didn’t think it was ‘the change.’ This change my grandmother warned me about sounded like the devil exorcising my soul, and I just knew it would never happen to me, at least until I was super old like my grandma. I was convinced I was pregnant; I was still ripe in my youth, I could still have babies, right? I called my OB/GYN to schedule a visit, fearing that I could be pregnant. I took three pregnancy tests before my appointment, and all were negative. I was confused and subconsciously refusing to even consider ‘the change.’ I arrived at my appointment and explained to my doctor that I wasn’t pregnant, but I wasn’t going through menopause because I had my period off and on over the past few months. She told me to describe my symptoms and leave out the self-diagnosis part.

I guess I was jumping ahead of myself, and after all, I didn’t go to medical school. She drew blood, did a routine pap smear and pelvic exam. She scheduled a follow-up visit for me in one week to go over my lab work. She told me to prepare for peri-menopause, but that was likely what it was. I was stunned and in disbelief. I was 41; did she overlook that? Indeed, it is something much worse. Cancer? Endometriosis? I think I was willing to accept a devastating diagnosis rather than accept that I was approaching ‘the change.’ Some of my classmates were having babies at my age; what the hell was going on with me? I was in complete denial. 

I returned to my follow-up appointment with a bit of a chip on my shoulder, preparing to hear that my life was over. My doctor told me that my levels were peri-menopausal. I was numb and irritated. I know it was true, though, because the hot flashes and night sweats were still happening every day. Not to mention, no period. She said that the accurate diagnosis of menopause was a lack of period for 12 months. I had a ways to go for that, and she told me that I could still get pregnant even though she suggested that I continue to prevent it because it would take a toll on my body at this point in my life. She wanted to put me on hormones, basically straight estrogen and progesterone. I didn’t know much about hormones, but I knew that is what my grandma took, and she got breast cancer; it was somehow linked to the estrogen she had been taking. Luckily, she beat cancer, but the thought of me taking cancer pills freaked me out! I didn’t argue with her, took the written prescription and went to my car, and had a meltdown. I called my mom, and she calmed me down as mothers do. She told me that she also went through menopause early in life and suggested that I visit a clinic that specialized in bioidentical hormone replacement. She said it was a safer option than the prescription given to me by my OB/GYN and that this clinic actually monitored my hormone levels and symptom relief to determine precisely how much or how little I needed. I was all in! I called and made an appointment. I had a consultation right away with a practitioner that specialized in hormones all day, every day. I told her that I was not ready to accept and menopausal diagnosis, she completely understood. She said that everyone is different and that even though some of my friends may not be experiencing the same symptoms I was having, their hormones were declining. Everyone’s hormones decline, especially in the 30’s she said. Who knew? We drew labs, and I followed up a week later. The lab results were almost identical to what my OB/GYN had drawn, with the exception of a few things. She suggested that I start with a very low-dose estrogen pellet and testosterone pellet. She said I needed to take progesterone at night as well. She said that normally within a few weeks, I would notice my sweats subsiding, sex drive increasing, and probably more energy and better mood. I did it, and I scheduled my first pellet insertion. The pellets are tiny, like the size of a cooked grain of rice. They are placed under the skin and would breakdown over time by my body. She insisted on the importance of journaling my symptom relief and any side effects I may notice so she could fine-tune my dose for the subsequent insertion. Within two weeks, I had a whole night of sleep again without having to wash my sheets in the morning. My sex drive was back and probably a bit more intense than before, but no complaints there. I felt like I was normal like I had hope. I had to get past that peri-menopause was not a death sentence or an instant law requiring me to ask for the senior discount at the local department store. This is a part of life, and this is the shift my body made. There is no timeline for this kind of thing. My female anatomy had been good to me for years, gave me beautiful children, and made me the woman I am. Now it is time that I nurture it back. Accepting peri-menopause was a mindset, and it is one that I have embraced. If I had not had the advice from my mom to seek out bioidentical hormone replacement, I don’t know what I would have done. I got very little counseling from my OB/GYN; I had no direction and found no compassion until I went to a clinic that specialized in BHRT. They were my lifesaver!

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Restore Your Quality of Life https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/restore-your-quality-of-life/ Wed, 16 Sep 2020 13:47:45 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/restore-your-quality-of-life/ Aging poses changes for men and women. Imbalanced hormones can significantly affect your quality of life. It is common to assume that these symptoms are just the expected signs of aging and that nothing can be done to address it. The good news is, there are options. 

 

When estrogen and progesterone levels become deficient, menopause or perimenopause begins, marking the end of childbearing. 

For women, menopause can begin as early as their 40s and can affect all facets of life. The most notable symptoms of menopause are hot flashes, night sweats, and low sex drive, to name a few. However, menopausal symptoms are person-specific and can vary across the board. Many women will note that their friends and family notice a shift in mood, anxiety, or irritability. It is common to become forgetful or experience ‘brain fog’, along with a lack of sleep. Experiencing these symptoms affect interpersonal relationships and even career. As a lack of sleep presents itself, it isn’t easy to function during the day, especially for activities like going to the gym and keeping active. Some women describe this as a snowball effect; if you can’t work out, you gain weight and risk becoming unhealthy. Gaining weight can result in low self-esteem, and so on. 

 

Women are not the only ones dealing with low hormones in life; men can experience severe changes and symptoms as well. When men’s bodies stop producing sufficient testosterone, they may notice a loss of sex drive, inability to sustain an erection, loss of muscle tone, fatigue, to name a few. 

 

The excellent news is bioidentical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) can help both men and women restore their vitality. BHRT is a well documented and accepted way to replenish hormone levels by using plant-based pellets that are compounded specifically for you, under strict supervision of State Boards of Pharmacy. You will need to begin by finding a clinic that specializes in BHRT and making an appointment for a consultation. Be prepared to discuss your symptoms, healthy history, and make sure to bring an up to date list of any medications that you take, including supplements and over the counter medications. A complete record of this information is vital for the practitioner to evaluate and ensure proper dosing of your hormones. 

 

It is essential to discuss your symptoms thoroughly. A journal is an excellent way to keep up with the changes in your body, as it is easy to lose track of them. Once your blood is drawn, it is sent away to a lab to analyze the levels of hormones. After your practitioner evaluates the report from the lab, an appointment will be made for you to come back in to discuss your treatment plan, review the expected benefits and potential side effects.  Your hormone pellets will be ordered for your specific needs, as there is no one size fits all approach to hormone replacement. 

 

The next step is a small area on your hip is prepped and numbed, and then the pellets are inserted. Most patients report little to no discomfort and can carry on with their typical day for the most part. You will notice soreness over the next day or so, similar to a bruise. You will be given a follow-up appointment for another lab draw to help establish your baseline. 

 

It will take a few months to feel the benefits of BHRT. Keep in mind, you experienced a depletion in hormones over years, so no treatment will become effective immediately. It is vital to keep your appointments and a close track of your symptom relief along with any other changes so you can accurately report your progress at your follow up visits. 

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Who Decides what is Normal when it Comes to Hormones? https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/who-decides-what-is-normal-when-it-comes-to-hormones/ Mon, 22 Jun 2020 20:33:08 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/who-decides-what-is-normal-when-it-comes-to-hormones/ As Sophia on ‘The Golden Girls’ would preface her famous stories, picture it, you are at your PCP office for your yearly physical. Your doctor asks you how you are doing. Instead of saying the inevitable, “fine,” you decide to disclose the truth. You feel awful, and something seems off. You have found yourself snapping at your spouse and coworkers over nothing. One moment you think life is sustainable the next moment you feel like the walls are caving in and nothing is going right. You get hot for no reason, and you have gained weight that you can’t blame on the holidays. Your friends suggest cautiously, “could it be your hormones?” How offensive is that? The thought of the people you thought cared most about you making you feel like you are old or even worse menopausal. Wait. Maybe they are right. So you ask your doctor to check your hormones to consider the possibility. And in a flash, you receive a quick, “Nope, we don’t do that.” Or worse, you get the old, “here is a prescription for an antidepressant, you’re probably just depressed.” Nothing feels worse than feeling discounted or that you are overreacting. Any time you feel like your body is telling you something, you have a right to ask. An empathetic doctor will at least hear you out.  If your doctor does agree to order a hormone panel, likely when the results come back, you will get very little explanation as to what the levels mean or told that your levels are all within a normal range. Why?

 

Doctors are trained to read the lab’s suggestions on what ‘normal range’ is. The interesting thing is that different labs have different ‘normals.’ There’s a fun fact for you! The labs determine the normal ranges. Now, most of the ranges across the board of different labs are similar but not identical. The problem is that what is normal for you may not be normal for the next person. The normal range also does not mean that your hormones are balanced across the board, either. Hormones work together, and if one level is on the high end of normal and the other is on the low end of normal, that is not going to create a balance. 

 

The other issue with normal ranges is that your hormones change a lot, so checking your hormone levels just once only gives you one piece to a much larger puzzle. If you are peri-menopausal, ovulating or menopausal will all play a part in where the lab values fall as well, without considering where your cycle may be (if at all). The lab results don’t mean much, if anything at all. Have you had a hysterectomy? Do you still have any periods? When was the last time? Have you had an ablation? Do you have an IUD? These are all factors that need to be considered alongside your actual lab values. If your PCP doesn’t specialize in hormones, he may not consider these factors. 

 

Another huge factor in evaluating lab results are the symptoms. Your body is responding to changes, and that can look like many different things. You may have extreme changes in body temperature with little to no warning. You may notice that you are easily agitated, and things that bother you now aren’t things that used to bother you. Your sex drive could be down or gone and follow that with vaginal dryness, just to name a few. 

 

The takeaway from all of this is not to encourage you to disregard your PCP. Just consider that if you had a heart condition, you would want to be seen by a heart doctor. If you break a bone, you probably won’t call a kidney doctor. Hormone replacement is no different. Hormone replacement is a specialty, just like other practices of medicine. Find a hormone specialist that can discuss with you safe options like bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. You have one life to live, don’t settle for being told you are ‘normal’ when you know your body better than anybody else could. Meet with the experts, and what you find may surprise you. 

 

 

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BHRT for Men Dealing With Hormonal Imbalance https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/bhrt-for-men-dealing-with-hormonal-imbalance/ Thu, 28 May 2020 18:30:38 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/bhrt-for-men-dealing-with-hormonal-imbalance/ BHRT For Men Dealing With Hormonal Imbalance 

 

My wife starting going through ‘the change’ two years ago. Needless to say, it changed our lives. We had always had a very close relationship and fought rarely. We were always considered to be ‘that couple’ that other people wanted to mirror. We are married for over 30 years, two kids, a house with a fence. We are pretty simple people. We mind our own business and just live our lives as best we can. We are both hard workers and really enjoy our vacation each year. Our vacation is something that we saved for throughout the year, and since being empty nesters, it is our splurge. Two years ago, when she began exhibiting signs of menopause, we were on our coveted vacation. She felt awful and was very sensitive just about everything. We ended up in an argument that resulted in us not speaking for the remainder of our trip, which was about five days. Needless to say, it was a memorable trip in the worst way.

When we returned, my wife decided to go to a clinic that specialized in bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. Within a few months, she began feeling better, and it was great to see her happier. It’s easy, as a man, to chock everything up to blame on menopause and take no responsibility for a bad experience. As much as I would love to take no blame, I was to blame as well.

There is no way that a woman goes through this massive change in her life, and men are left unscathed. Granted, I firmly believe that menopause is much worse than anything a man experiences with age, but there had to be a direct result of aging for men as well. The answer is Andropause. When a man starts to decline in testosterone production significantly, noticeable changes can take place. Sure, I stopped working out as much as I used to, but why? I didn’t have the energy or mental motivation to go anymore. Also, my cholesterol was through the roof, and my doctor started me on a statin.

After reading about the side effects and risks of taking statins, I knew my lifestyle needed a change. I knew that there had to be a more natural way of treating what was going on. If my wife needed hormone replacement therapy, why wouldn’t I? After I visited our local bio-identical hormone replacement clinic, I found out that I also needed to address severely deficient hormones. After I got my labs drawn, the doctor called me and said that he had no doubt I felt awful. The funny thing is, I knew I wasn’t my old self, but I didn’t realize I was as bad off as I was. I had gotten used to feeling sluggish and less libido. I figured that my belly getting bigger is just part of life; my dad did it, my brothers did it. Accepting negative health changes only made sense to me. After my BHRT began, I finally realized just how bad I really did feel! Once I noticed my energy increase and my waistline decrease, I knew that I could never go back to where I was before BHRT.

Understanding that women go through far worse symptoms of low hormones is mind-blowing. What I don’t understand is why do we accept these negative changes as ‘normal’? Who sets that standard? My PCP told me that the midsection weight gain was genetic, and to cut back on having a few beers on the weekend. Never once was the topic of my hormone levels brought up.

Watching bio-identical hormone replacement change my wife’s quality of life and then experiencing the very same thing for myself makes me want to scream this from the rooftops! I feel like too many people are told that aging and decline is normal and to deal with it. If I have an issue, I don’t want to be told to accept it or put a bandage on it like buying elastic waistband pants! This is my health, body, and I do have the right to hear all of the possibilities as well as the options for treatment. Instead, my PCP didn’t know enough about BHRT; therefore, it was left out of our conversation. I feel bad that so many others live in misery like myself and my wife did for the remainder of their lives. This is a golden time in our life, kids are gone, and we get to live life more. I am so thankful for BHRT; it has given us both a second chance at life. We are closer than we have been in years, and we are happy. I love to tell my story because if it reaches even one person that didn’t know about BHRT, I feel like I have shared my wealth!

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Our Hormones and Immune System https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/our-hormones-and-immune-system/ Mon, 20 Apr 2020 15:56:43 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/our-hormones-and-immune-system/ As we grow older, our immune system does not work as diligently as it did when we were younger. There have been numerous studies on sex hormones and immune system function.
Many factors affect how the immune system functions. Females are more likely to become victims of autoimmune diseases like Multiple Sclerosis, Crohn’s Disease, Lupus, and other thyroid disorders. There has been a significant rise in autoimmune diseases in women over the past 30 years. This trend is not only very concerning; there is no simple explanation as to why this is happening in women more than men. Some theories are that the difference in levels of the sex hormones, estrogen, and testosterone between men and women could be the culprit. Since women are at a higher risk of developing autoimmune diseases, this indicates that sex hormones mitigate certain autoimmune conditions.

During pregnancy, women with autoimmune disorders often see a relief in their symptoms due to the increase in estrogen, only to see those same symptoms return or worsen post-pregnancy, after estrogen drops. This corresponds with the theory that declining estrogen weakens the immune system. Proper estrogen balance is essential, as a reduction reduces levels of B-cells and T-cells; these cells are the primary cells of the immune system. Women that experience early menopause are at an increased risk of developing autoimmune disorders than women that have a greater decline in hormone function later in life. Those that already suffer from immune disorders will likely see a worsening of those conditions. The overall reduction of sex hormones can contribute to changes in the function of the immune system. This can mean being more susceptible to the common cold or viruses. The inability to fight off these bugs can lead to serious health conditions. This has been a hot topic recently with the COVID-19 pandemic. Older people are more likely to succumb to the virus.

Bio-identical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) is helpful for improving the debilitating symptoms associated with menopause; it can also aid in building up the immune system, especially when women are supplementing with estrogen.

Estrogen stimulates the production of anti-inflammatory, immune-boosting cytokines, which, in turn, protect against and help alleviate and slow the progression of certain autoimmune diseases. If you are dealing with any of these conditions, discuss with your physician how you can be improved with a hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) plan—it may make all the difference.

A proper balance between estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone is essential to overall health and wellness. More research is needed in the arena of immune disorders and deficient hormone levels. However, with what has been learned about auto immune disorders, there is hope with bio-identical hormone replacement therapy.

There is still much to be researched in the area of immune dysfunction and menopause; however, the research that is proving the link between hormone fluctuations and immune disturbances is quite strong.

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Be Proactive! https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/2357-2/ Wed, 11 Mar 2020 15:38:40 +0000 https://hormonehealthandweightloss.com/2357-2/ The average age for menopause in the United States is 51, according to the Mayo Clinic. But menopause can happen to women throughout their 40’s and 50’s, too. However, it is possible for perimenopause to start in the late 30s (early or premature menopause) and early 40’s. The symptoms of menopause vary from woman to woman. The symptoms range from hot flashes, night sweats, anxiety, loss of libido, insomnia, and mood changes. However, some women may experience no symptoms while going through menopause. Menopause is triggered by the lack of estrogen produced by the ovaries. The primary indicator of menopause is an irregular menstrual cycle that eventually becomes non-existent.

Menopause is a reality check that things are changing. The symptoms can remind you of this “change” throughout the day. Keeping an eye on what you eat is essential all the time, but primarily essential through menopause. Maintaining a healthy diet like incorporating vegetables, fruits, and whole grains is vital for the proper function of all of your body systems. If you must drink alcohol, keep it to a minimum, one drink or less per day. Cutting back on caffeine and spicy foods can help with hot flashes in some cases. Also, watching your salt intake can help as well. Staying hydrated is critical for all aspects of good health. Water moves fiber through your body and can also help against hot flashes.

Incorporating calcium in your diet is especially important during menopause. It is recommended that you need about 1,200 milligrams of calcium each day. In addition to calcium supplements, you can find significant calcium in dairy products, kale, fortified cereal, fortified orange juice, soybeans, and fortified soy milk.

Stay active! Try to do at least 30 minutes of cardio exercise a day or a few days a week, at least. Taking your dog for a walk or walking on a trail can help get your heart rate up as well as being easily enjoyed. Make decisions that will help you to be more active, even if it is choosing to park further away from your destination or choosing the stair over the elevator.

Keep in mind that menopause is a process, which typically has an end. Keeping yourself as healthy as possible through the process will help you to feel your best once the worst of menopause has passed. It’s a similar concept to ‘weathering the storm.’ Aging causes the body to take a metabolic slowdown. Weight gain can cause many health issues, from heart conditions to diabetes. Weight gain can also cause depression and low self-image.

Making changes to diet and exercise takes a lot of dedication and motivation. It is not easy; there are many community groups available to surround yourself with positive motivation and support. To stay dedicated to new diet and activity choices, it is a good idea to find others that are active in the same lifestyle choices.

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